Author: Ha Pe

9 Low-Key Genius Things To Buy In November

9 Low-Key Genius Things To Buy In November

Here's the thing, I am particular about my pyjamas (or "jammies" if I'm totally honest). When my mum was diagnosed with cancer last year, I bought her a pair of luxury pyjamas from Liberty, as if she was going to be in hospital, I wanted her to feel as glam as possible.All of which is to say that I treat pyjamas the way other people treat skincare or candles – I'll buy from expensive places, discount places, and the high street – I don't care where they're from but I want them to work. That means they need to be able to go in the washing machine, be loose enough to toss and turn in during the night, and hold up for a couple of years. This is where Made comes in. They've launched 100% linen pyjamas for £59. I cannot express how much I love these pyjamas. I have bought a second pair alrea
Four In Five Australians Don't Want An Unequal Same-Sex Marriage Law: Poll

Four In Five Australians Don't Want An Unequal Same-Sex Marriage Law: Poll

If same-sex marriage becomes legal in Australia, almost four in five people want a law that doesn't single out gay couples with religious and conscientious exemptions, a new poll has found.The new poll comes as speculation grows over what a same-sex marriage bill should look like if Australia votes "yes" in the current postal survey, with tensions arising between opposing groups in both the government and the LGBTI community.The Galaxy poll, commissioned by PFLAG and provided to BuzzFeed News, canvassed 1,000 Australians on their views on same-sex marriage from October 26 to 30.In response to the question, "If the majority vote ‘yes’ in the postal survey, should same-sex couples be treated the same under the law compared with other couples?", 78% of respondents said yes.This fig
Climbing Uluru Will Be Banned From October 2019

Climbing Uluru Will Be Banned From October 2019

Climbing Uluru will be banned from October 2019, after the board of the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park unanimously agreed to prohibit climbers.Currently climbing is not banned, but the traditional owners of the land, Anangu, would prefer people not climb Uluru. According to Parks Australia, the climb was the traditional route taken by the Mala (wallaby) people on their arrival at Uluru from up north, and the path is of great significance to Anangu.The board announced in 2010 that it would close the climb once the proportion of visitors to Uluru who chose to ascend the rock fell below 20%. According to reports, at that time it was 38%, down from 74% in the 1990s, but as of 2015, it was down to 16.2%.Board chairman and Uluru traditional owner Sammy Wilson said in a statement that ...